Ne travaillez jamais
Ne travaillez jamais
Ne travaillez jamais
Ne travaillez jamais
Ne travaillez jamais
Ne travaillez jamais
Ne travaillez jamais

Ne travaillez jamais

Ne travaillez Jamais (Never Work) takes its name from the situationist principle against alienating working conditions. The phrase was painted on a wall at Rue de Seine in Paris in 1953 by Guy Debord. It incites the dismantling of twhatever is left of the mythology surrounding the worker embedded in ourselves. This means dealing with the very issues where (through labor and the social possibilities this offers) dignity and individual liberation trasnpire and where the saturated and obsessive mechanisms of power that produce narratives related to work and unemployment lie.

Ne Travaillez Jamais, through the press and the media, focuses on the narrative that defines its subjects as valid or invalid members of the social system depending on the capacity to take part in the labor machine. On one side, it confronts the headlines relating to unemployment (el paro, as it is known in Spain) printed in 2015’s biggest news channels. These scarcely reflexive headlines are projected without proper context and at an unintelligable pace.

Beside the projection, a made-to-measure table displays several stacks of paper composed of official documents, legal texts, newspaper articles, photographs of riots, number tables with statistics, graphs, historical documents with recent testimonies, individual cases followed by global analysis, etc. All this information is made available for editing and revision by visitors at all times, allowing for a different narrative to take shape, modifying the initial, alternate history composed. The display format and the accumulation of information evidence the difficulties involved accessing hard facts and individual, specific instances which are the true source of information indicating how, who, and from what place what we understand today as work is fabricated – dismantling the strategies of conformity and our labor imaginary.

 


© Pictures 1 to 5: Roberto Ruiz. Courtesy ADN Galería
© Pictures 6 and 7: Pancho de León